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The Lost World
Cover of The Lost World
The Lost World
Jurassic Park Series, Book 2
Borrow Borrow
From the author of Timeline, Sphere, and Congo comes the sequel to the smash-hit Jurassic Park, a thriller that's been millions of years in the making.

#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER

"Fast and gripping."—The Washington Post Book World

It is now six years since the secret disaster at Jurassic Park, six years since the extraordinary dream of science and imagination came to a crashing end—the dinosaurs destroyed, the park dismantled, and the island indefinitely closed to the public.

There are rumors that something has survived. . . .

"Harrowing thrills . . . fast-paced and engaging."—People

"A very scary read."—Entertainment Weekly

"Action-packed."—New York Daily News

"An edge-of-the-seat tale."—St. Petersburg Times
From the author of Timeline, Sphere, and Congo comes the sequel to the smash-hit Jurassic Park, a thriller that's been millions of years in the making.

#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER

"Fast and gripping."—The Washington Post Book World

It is now six years since the secret disaster at Jurassic Park, six years since the extraordinary dream of science and imagination came to a crashing end—the dinosaurs destroyed, the park dismantled, and the island indefinitely closed to the public.

There are rumors that something has survived. . . .

"Harrowing thrills . . . fast-paced and engaging."—People

"A very scary read."—Entertainment Weekly

"Action-packed."—New York Daily News

"An edge-of-the-seat tale."—St. Petersburg Times
Available formats-
  • OverDrive Read
  • EPUB eBook
Languages:-
Copies-
  • Available:
    1
  • Library copies:
    1
Levels-
  • ATOS:
    5.0
  • Lexile:
    670
  • Interest Level:
    UG
  • Text Difficulty:
    3 - 4

Recommended for you

Excerpts-
  • From the book

    The Lost World: Story Excerpt ~ DiegoIn places, the Jeep track was hardly recognizable, so thickly had the jungle grown back. Clearly, no one had used this road for many years, and the jungle was always ready to return.

    Behind him, Diego grunted, swore softly. Levine turned and saw Diego lifting his foot gingerly; he had stepped to mid-ankle in a pile of green animal-droppings. Levine went back.

    Diego scraped his boot clean on the stem of a fern. The droppings appeared to be composed of pale flecks of hay, mixed with green. The material was light and crumbly - dried, old. There was no smell.

    Levine searched the ground carefully, until he found the remainder of the original spoor. The droppings were well formed, twelve centimeters in diameter. Definitely left behind by some large herbivore.

    Diego was silent, but his eyes were wide.

    Levine shook his head, continued on. As long as they saw signs of herbivora, he wasn't going to worry. At least, not too much. Even so, his fingers touched the butt of his pistol, as if for reassurance.

    They came to a stream, muddy banks on both sides. Here Levine paused. He saw clear three-toed footprints in the mud, some of them quite large. The palm of his own hand, fingers spread wide, fitted easily inside one of the prints, with room to spare.

    When he looked up, Diego was crossing himself again. He held the rifle in his other hand.

    They waited at the stream, listening to the gentle gurgle of the water. Something shiny glinted in the stream, catching his eye. He bent over, and plucked it out. It was a piece of glass tubing, roughly the size of a pencil. One end was broken off. There were graduated markings along the side. He realized it was a pipette, of the kind used in laboratories everywhere in the world. Levine held it up to the light, turning it in his fingers. It was odd, he thought. A pipette like this implied-

    Levine turned, and caught a glimpse of movement out of the corner of his eye. Something small and brown, scurrying across the mud of the riverbank. Something about the size of a rat.

    Diego grunted in surprise. Then it was gone, disappearing in foliage.

    Levine moved forward and crouched in the mud by the stream. He peered at the footprints left by the tiny animal. The footprints were three-toed, like the tracks of a bird. He saw more three-toed tracks, including some bigger ones, which were several inches across.

    Levine had seen such prints before, in trackways such as the Purgatoire River in Colorado, where the ancient shoreline was now fossilized, the dinosaur tracks frozen in stone. But these prints were in fresh mud. And they had been made by living animals.

    Sitting on his haunches, Levine heard a soft squeak coming from somewhere to his right. Looking over, he saw the ferns moving slightly. He stayed very still, waiting.

    After a moment, a small animal peeked out from among the fronds. It appeared to be the size of a mouse; it had smooth, hairless skin and large eyes mounted high on its tiny head. It was greenish-brown in color, and it made a continuous, irritable squeaking sound at Levine, as if to drive him away. Levine stayed motionless, hardly daring to breathe.

    He recognized this creature, of course. It was a mussaurus, a tiny prosauropod from the Late Triassic. Skeletal remains were found only in South America. It was one of the smallest dinosaurs known. A dinosaur, he thought.

    Even though he had expected to see them on this island, it was still startling to be confronted by a living, breathing member of the Dinosauria. Especially one so small. He could not take his eyes off it. He was entranced. After...

About the Author-
  • Michael Crichton's novels include The Andromeda Strain, The Great Train Robbery, Congo, Jurassic Park, Rising Sun, Disclosure, and The Lost World. He was as well the creator of the television series ER. Crichton died in 2008.

Reviews-
  • Publisher's Weekly

    September 4, 1995
    One fact about this sequel to Jurassic Park stands out above all: it follows a book that, with spinoffs, including the movie, proved to be the most profitable literary venture ever. So where does the author of a near billion-dollar novel sit? Squarely on the shoulders of his own past work--and Arthur Conan Doyle's. Crichton has borrowed from Conan Doyle before--Rising Sun was Holmes and Watson in Japan--but never so brazenly. The title itself here, the same as that of Conan Doyle's yarn about an equatorial plateau rife with dinos, acknowledges the debt. More enervating are Crichton's self-borrowings: the plot line of this novel reads like an outtake from JP. Instead of bringing his dinos to a city, for instance, Crichton keeps them in the Costa Rican jungle, on an offshore island that was the secret breeding ground for the beasts. Only chaos theoretician Ian Malcolm, among the earlier principals, returns to explore this Lost World, six years after the events of JP; but once again, there's a dynamic paleontologist, a pretty female scientist and two cute kids, boy and girl--the latter even saves the day through clever hacking, just as in JP. Despite stiff prose and brittle characters, Chrichton can still conjure unparalleled dino terror, although the wonder is gone and the attacks are predictable, the pacing perfunctory. But his heart now seems to be not so much in the storytelling as in pedagogy: from start to finish, the novel aims to illustrate Crichton's ideas about extinction--basically, that it occurs because of behavioral rather than environmental changes--and reads like a scientific fable, with pages of theory balancing the hectic action. As science writing, it's a lucid, provocative undertaking; but as an adventure and original entertainment, even though it will sell through the roof, it seems that Crichton has laid a big dinosaur egg. 2,000,000 first printing; BOMC and QPB main selection.

  • Library Journal

    September 15, 1995
    When strange animal carcasses begin to wash up on the shores of Costa Rica, an eccentric paleontologist suspects that dinosaurs may exist somewhere in the area. This much-anticipated sequel to the megahit Jurassic Park (Knopf, 1990) reads more like a movie novelization: so bereft of plot and characterization in deference to action that it is closer in spirit to Steven Spielberg's movie version (1993) than to the entertaining and educational novel that preceded it. Reprising their roles from Jurassic Park are Ian Malcolm, who bought the farm courtesy of a T-rex in JP but whom Crichton seemingly couldn't resist resurrecting, and Lew Dodgson, the evil scientist who makes a living stealing ideas from his fellow researchers. Malcolm and Dodgson, leading separate parties, converge on a small Costa Rican island where the resident raptors, tyrannosaurs, and other carnivores make their field trip distinctly unpleasant. Despite its flaws, however, there will undoubtedly be huge demand in public libraries for Crichton's latest. [Previewed in Prepub Alert, LJ 6/1/95.]-Mark Annichiarico, "Library Journal

  • Booklist

    September 1, 1995
    Every Cretaceous critter in John Hammond's bioengineered dinosaur preserve was destroyed after the events of "Jurassic Park." Yet five years later, carcasses of recently dead, supposedly extinct saurians are washing ashore on nearby islands. Time for intrepid scientists to discover and observe again. Onboard this time are the chaos and complexity theorist who almost died in Hammond's folly, a stuck-up rich guy paleontologist, an Amazon of a large-animal ethologist, a regular-guy engineering genius and his assistant, and two computer whiz kids who stow away to join the adults. And, of course, there are venal villains (three) trying to get to the salable goods first (guess what their fate is). Crichton adroitly combines popular scientific colloquy and ripping good, blood-and-guts (literally) action once again. If it all seems rather predictable, remember that the pleasures of familiarity and referentiality rank high among the rewards of popular fiction. Here such pleasures begin with the title, plundered directly from the granddaddy of the modern-day dinosaur romance, Arthur Conan Doyle's "Lost World" (1912). ((Reviewed Sept. 1, 1995))(Reprinted with permission of Booklist, copyright 1995, American Library Association.)

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Jurassic Park Series, Book 2
Michael Crichton
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